ampersanden:

In Bradley his Book 1896. ATF advertising #letterpress #foundry #typography

americayall:

"i’m lucky to have someone to miss."

new post up on www.americayall.com


Erwin Blumenfeld  ”Rage for Colors” published in Look, October 15, 1958 (via)

Erwin Blumenfeld  ”Rage for Colors” published in Look, October 15, 1958 (via)

Erwin Blumenfeld  ”Rage for Colors” published in Look, October 15, 1958 (via)

(via vintagegal)

amjayes:

“Travelling around the Europe, racing every weekend, able to meet the crumpet and have fun. A wonderful life.” - Sir Stirling Moss.

(via mrh-blog)

My messy hair and I haven’t left the house in two days. #gradschoollife (at Telegraph Hill, London)

Naomi // Neutral Milk Hotel

Your prettiness is seeping through
out from the dress I took from you. 

so pretty. 


And my emptiness is swollen shut,

always a wretch; I have become
so empty and please
please don’t leave me.

cadenced:

Robin Williams with a Pegoretti bicycle in Mill Valley, California in 2007. The story behind the photo from Above Category can be found over at the Wall Street Journal. RIP

rattrappress:

thecolorofwar:

Best British flying ace of World War II, James “Johnny” Johnson (James Edgar Johnson, 1915 - 2001) with a Labrador named Sally. In the background Spitfire fighter Mk.IX (Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX). 

Johnson first combat missions completed in December 1940 as part of 616 Squadron. During the patrol raids over occupied Europe, he claimed his first victory confirmed: June 26, 1941 brought down to “Spitfire» Mk.IIA Bf.109E German fighter over northern France. During his military career, James Edgar Johnson personally won 34 victories in aerial combat (27 of them on the “Spitfire» Mk.IX) and seven in the group. In addition, three personal and two group wins considered probable; He destroyed 10 aircraft on the ground. Johnson became the highest scoring fighter pilot, flying in the war on “Spitfire”. All planes were downed single-engine fighters. 

(via TumbleOn)

theniftyfifties:

A street scene in Montmartre, Paris, 1950s. Photo by Robert Capa.

(via girlinlondon)